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anthemia
anthemia
Bruh
54 featured
This is adorable :)
anthemia anthemia
16 nov 2019
Awesome! :)
anthemia anthemia
27 feb
I am not going to be active on this account anymore. Thanks for the ride. See you later.
aioi Follow
Recently, I have been thinking a lot about the idea that humans are the last species in our genus. this idea that we are alone as a genus and we weren't originally alone seems quite sad to me. I find myself wondering what life would be like with our long-dead cousins. Even if we managed to co-exist, would we inbreed to a point where we are left with only one species? Or would we remain different? Would we have money and cities and math? And most importantly in my opinion, would we still search the cosmos for life knowing we are not alone on our planet? Do we look for life in the universe because very distantly we remember our cousins and desperately wish for them back?
This of course seems 8 silly idea. But is it? When canadian monarch butterflies start to migrate to
Mexico, they never complete their journey.
Instead, their children or grandchildren will complete it for them.. And during this journey, an odd thing happens. When butterflies cross lake superior, they detor over the middle of the lake- but nothing is blocking them. It is theorized when they detor they are flying around a mountain that hasn't existed for millennia. These butterflies somehow remember a mountain, on a journey where the knowledge cannot be taught.
Can we, as animals, genetically remember memories? We certainly have early survival instincts. What's the stretch to say that somehow remember deeply and subconsciously our cousins. That man's early mind is still trying to find them? Is that why man searches?
Because we had family a long time ago?
anthemia anthemia
7 feb
aioi Follow Recently, I have been thinking a lot about the idea that humans are the last species in our genus. this idea that we are alone as a genus and we weren't originally alone seems quite sad to me. I find myself wondering what life would be like with our long-dead cousins. Even if we managed to co-exist, would we inbreed to a point where we are left with only one species? Or would we remain different? Would we have money and cities and math? And most importantly in my opinion, would we still search the cosmos for life knowing we are not alone on our planet? Do we look for life in the universe because very distantly we remember our cousins and desperately wish for them back? This of course seems 8 silly idea. But is it? When canadian monarch butterflies start to migrate to Mexico, they never complete their journey. Instead, their children or grandchildren will complete it for them.. And during this journey, an odd thing happens. When butterflies cross lake superior, they detor over the middle of the lake- but nothing is blocking them. It is theorized when they detor they are flying around a mountain that hasn't existed for millennia. These butterflies somehow remember a mountain, on a journey where the knowledge cannot be taught. Can we, as animals, genetically remember memories? We certainly have early survival instincts. What's the stretch to say that somehow remember deeply and subconsciously our cousins. That man's early mind is still trying to find them? Is that why man searches? Because we had family a long time ago?